GABY SANCHEZ
FIRST BASEMAN
Born: September 2, 1983
Height: 6’1″
Weight: 230
Bats: Right
Throws: Right
Drafted: 4th Round, 126th Overall, 2005 (Marlins)
How Acquired: Traded from Marlins
College: University of Miami (FL)
Agent: Beverly Hills Sports Council

WTM’S PIRATE PLAYER PROFILES

Sanchez missed his junior year at Miami due to a suspension, but the Marlins drafted him based on the familiarity one of their scouts had with him.  He put up some gaudy numbers at times in the minors, but not always, and he generally was a little old for his level.  He showed mostly doubles power, but also showed exceptional strike zone judgment.  He had two solid seasons in the majors for the Marlins, but collapsed in 2012.  He’s had strong platoon splits in the majors, with an OPS of .878 against LHPs and .715 against RHPs.  He’s shown the ability to steal a base occasionally.  In the minors, he played first most of the time, but got considerable time at third in the upper minors and also caught a little in the low minors.  UZR and +/- both show him to be above average defensively at first.  The Pirates acquired Sanchez and a marginal minor league pitcher for Gorkys Hernandez and the team’s competitive balance lottery pick.

2005
A-:  355/401/487, 234 AB, 16 2B, 5 HR, 16 BB, 24 K, 11-16 SB

Sanchez had a strong debut in the New York-Penn League, winning the batting title.  He played 30 games at third, 12 at first and 11 behind the plate.

2006
R:  333/636/500, 6 AB, 1 2B, 5 BB
A:  317/447/603, 189 AB, 12 2B, 14 HR, 39 BB, 20 K, 6-8 SB
A+:  182/324/327, 55 AB, 3 2B, 1 3B, 1 HR, 12 BB, 12 K, 1-1 SB

Sanchez tore up the South Atlantic League for a while, but had his season derailed by nagging finger and foot injuries.  He caught a little but mostly played first.

2007
A+:  279/369/433, 547 AB, 40 2B, 3 3B, 9 HR, 64 BB, 74 K, 6-12 SB

Spending a full season in the Florida State League, Sanchez hit respectably but didn’t dominate, although at 23 he wasn’t young for the level.  He played almost entirely at first, but got into a few games at third and catcher.

2008
AA:  314/404/513, 557 AB, 42 2B, 1 3B, 17 HR, 69 BB, 70 K, 17-25 SB
MLB:  375/375/625, 8 AB, 2 2B, 2 K

In AA, Sanchez had a much better season, with outstanding plate discipline.  He split his time evenly between the infield corners.  Florida called him up in mid-September, but he saw little action.

2009
AAA:  289/374/475, 318 AB, 11 2B, 16 HR, 41 BB, 44 K, 5-5 SB
MLB:  238/304/524, 21 AB, 2 HR, 2 BB, 3 K

Playing in the pitcher’s park in New Orleans, but in the high-offense Pacific Coast League, Sanchez had a good season at the plate.  He got brief callups in July and August, then spent September in the majors.  He again split his time between first and third.

2010
MLB:  273/341/448, 572 AB, 37 2B, 3 3B, 19 HR, 57 BB, 101 K, 5-5 SB

Sanchez had a solid season as a 26-year-old rookie in the majors.  Although the numbers looked superficially good, his OPS+ was 108, which is nothing special for a firstbaseman.

2011
MLB:  266/352/427, 572 AB, 35 2B, 19 HR, 74 BB, 97 K, 3-4 SB

Sanchez’ 2011 season was very similar to his 2010 one.  His hitting tailed off just a little, but he had outstanding BB and K numbers.

2012
AAA (Mia):  302/431/491, 116 AB, 7 2B, 5 HR, 22 BB, 23 K, 2-4 SB
MLB (Mia):  202/250/306, 183 AB, 10 2B, 3 HR, 12 BB, 36 K, 1-1 SB
MLB (Pgh):  241/323/397, 116 AB, 6 2B, 4 HR, 13 BB, 20, K

Sanchez got off to a miserable start with the Marlins.  They sent him to the minors in mid-May with his OPS at just .539.  He came back up three weeks later and hit about the same.  Miami sent him back to AAA again after acquiring Carlos Lee.  The most obvious difference with Sanchez from prior years is the sudden drop in his walk rate.  He began swinging at a higher percentage of pitches out of the strike zone than the previous year.  His line drive rate dropped substantially, with most of the lost line drives becoming popups.  That suggests pitchers might have found a weakness, possibly pounding him inside, and he hasn’t adjusted yet.  After the trade, Sanchez stepped into Casey McGehee’s role on the short end of the first base platoon with Garrett Jones.  He hit well initially, showing more or less his old plate discipline, finishing the season in a 3-for-29 slump.  Part of the problem may have been mission creep, as Clint Hurdle played Sanchez increasingly against RHPs; Sanchez ended up getting nearly twice as many ABs against RHPs as against LHPs.  Hurdle even started Sanchez at times over Starling Marte, which is truly difficult to comprehend.

2013
MLB:  254/361/402, 264 AB, 18 2B, 7 HR, 44 BB, 51 K, 1-1 SB

Hurdle continued his obsession with playing Sanchez against RHPs at the very beginning of the season, but after watching him struggle for a few games, Hurdle went to the obvious solution, which was a 1B platoon between Sanchez and Jones.  Sanchez’ extreme splits continued:  he posted an OPS of .987 against LHPs and .619 against RHPs.  He got too many ABs against the latter — 61% of his plate appearances — but this happened mainly because other players either were hurt or not hitting.  Overall, Sanchez finished with the best BB:K ratio of his career and also the best OPS+ of his career.  (OPS+ is a comparative stat and hitting overall was down again in 2013, so Sanchez had his best OPS+ despite having only his third-best OPS.)  Sanchez was remarkably consistent; his worst monthly OPS was .717, but he did hit all of his HRs and April and June.  According to the defensive metrics, his glovework slipped significantly, but the sample size is small.  The Pirates used him at third a fair amount during spring training, but he played only four innings there during the season, his only major league appearance at the position.

Sanchez was eligible for arbitration, but he and the Pirates agreed on a $2.3M contract.  For some reason, some fans think Sanchez is one of the Pirates’ main problems, but this is impossible to understand.  He had one of the team’s better overall hitting lines and would have been better still if various personnel problems hadn’t required him to play too much against RHPs.  He murdered LHPs, which is certainly a useful skill.  The only way it would make any sense for the Pirates to let Sanchez go would be if they found an everyday first baseman, and even then he’d be a useful bench player.  During the off-season, though, they were unable even to find a platoon partner for Sanchez.  Instead, Travis Ishikawa won the role by default when Andrew Lambo went 4-for-42 in spring training.  It remains to be seen whether Clint Hurdle will use Sanchez and Ishikawa in a straight platoon, or whether Sanchez will get significant playing time against RHPs.  Regardless, until there’s a personnel change, the Pirates figure to get woefully inadequate offense from first base against righties.

STATS
Baseball Reference–Majors
Baseball Reference–Minors
Fangraphs
MLB.com
MiLB.com
CONTRACT INFORMATION
2014: $2,300,000
2013:
$1,750,000

  • Bonus of $25,000 each for 425, 475 and 525 ABs

2012: $483,000
2011: $431,000
2010: $401,000

PLAYER INFORMATION
Signing Bonus: $250,000
MiLB Debut: 2005
MLB Debut: 9/17/2008
MiLB FA Eligible: 2013
MLB FA Eligible: 2016
Rule 5 Eligible: Eligible
Added to 40-Man: September 14, 2008
Options Remaining: 1 (USED: 2009, 2012)
MLB Service Time: 4.025
TRANSACTIONS
June 4, 2002: Drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the 15th round, 460th overall pick.
June 7, 2005:
Drafted by the Miami Marlins in the 4th round, 126th overall pick; signed on June 8.
September 17, 2008: Contract purchased by the Miami Marlins.
July 31, 2012: Traded by the Miami Marlins to the Pittsburgh Pirates with Kyle Kaminska for Gorkys Hernandez and a competitive balance draft pick.